Top 5 ways to eat potatoes

28 January, 2020
Episode notes

Guest

Arielle Nissenblatt

Founder of the Earbuds Podcast Collective, co-creator of the Outlier Podcast Festival, a lover of license plates and roller blading.


Newsletter editor, event organiser and podcast wonder Arielle Nissenblatt joins Mark to discuss an often maligned tuber.

Arielle grew up almost exclusively on potatoes, although she admits her palate has broadened slightly since then. If you ever thought this vegetable (which is not a vegetable, it’s a tuber; we’ve covered this) was boring, prepare to have your mind exploded all the way off.

You’ll also learn some interesting facts about potatoes, so strap in and get ready to carbo-load.

Arielle’s picks

In order of discussion:

Hash browns

Hash brown

Both Arielle and Mark might be getting these and home fries confused, but we’re essentially talking about mashed up bits of potato, fried. Arielle used to have one of these on the bus to school, which proves she won at childhood.

French fries

French fries

The French fry is, at least for Americans, perhaps potatoes’ default state. Whether long and skinny, short and nubbly, or curly, it’s all good. The least said about sweet potato fries the better, mostly because they’re not potatoes.

Samosas

Samosas

The samosa is more a potato delivery mechanism, but a strong one. Mark is also a fan of the flavour of a curried potato, so it’s a strong showing.

Latkes

Latkes

As if hash browns and home fries weren’t enough, this common Jewish delicacy is another welcome addition to the mashed-up-bits-of-fried-potato roster.

Mark’s picks

In order of discussion:

Roast

Sunday roast

The humble roast potato is, believes Mark, a beautiful thing, and who can disagree? It’s hard to beat a fluffy potato filling, surrounded by salt and fat. And if that fat happens to come from a goose, so much the better.

Chips

Chips

Not, under any circumstances to be confused with French fries, chips are an important staple in British cuisine. Mark urges Arielle — and by extension, you the listener — to try and lay hands on a potato scallop, because it’s possible your life may not be the same afterwards.

Jacket potato

Jacket potato

The jacket — or baked — potato is Mark’s third choice, partially as a delivery mechanism for other flavours, but for Arielle, a delivery mechanism for butter. Rub olive oil and salt into the skin and pop it in the oven for three days. Delicious.

Shepherd’s pie

Shepherd’s pie

The mashed potato that serves as the hat for a cottage or shepherd’s pie — Mark preferring the lamb-based option — can be improved by deploying a fork, and sprinkling cheese all over it. Mashed potato didn’t, in its naked form make either list as such, but it’s important that it get a mention, even if it needs a little dressing up.

More of Arielle Nissenblatt

Follow Arielle on Twitter, and check out the Earbuds Podcast Collective, a global listening movement perfect for those among us that love a list.

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